Over the years, many different camps have sprouted in Winfield, where friends and families have
come together to share a year of memories, build and decorate village's and play a lot of music.
The Carp Camp, or Gather in the Grass, has grown from a group of Kansans trying to find a dry
place to camp, to a multinational family of contest winning crazies marching in the wrist band
parade.

Carp Diem - A day in the life of the Carp

Welcome to the Carp Camp. At 7:00 in the morning, or noon, breakfast seems to have a
Colorado flavor, whether it is in a pan of bacon frying, cheese and chocolate omelets, or sliced
frozen blood sausage. Later in the day, the camp is relatively quiet, with some tunes on the
mandolin or dulcimer, practicing new tunes, or recalling one from previous years. "Do you
remember this one?" A turkey is being smoked, and maybe the kitchen too... an informal
workshop might break out, "Tinkle music 101", "Three note tunes" or "Ballads where at least one
person dies" or "Introduction to ThermoCarpoDynamic Theory: Spank it!"

Set back, break out an ice cold IBC, a hot plate of carp lips, and watch late arriving
Humungobagos circle the grove looking for an area to park in, eyeballing the spot you are trying
to save for the late arrivals... you might see a couple of postal workers setting up a barn sized
tarp guilt in the gusting winds, or hear the lilting sound of a distant honey wagon.

Small groups of musicians are playing tunes, or tuning, or laying out a straw path to the golden
throne of bladder relief, while others nap... then you can smell the smoked turkey, and the chili
corn bread from a dutch oven, and the music stops long enough for a wonderful meal... but the
long beard is still tuning his dulcimer.

When the twilight comes and the sun goes down, the dulcimers are close to standard pitch, or
most of the strings anyway, and the tunes begin... American, Irish, Scottish, Bulgarian... just a few
instruments at first, but the session grows quickly, drawn to the sound of the dulcimers and the
site of the flying carp. The sets of tunes are exploratory at first..."who knows this one?", "Lets try
it with this new one from the homework", and as more musicians arrive, standard carp tunes
creep in...

As more people arrive, they bring dulcimers, guitars, mandolins, whistles and fiddles, and outcast
instruments as well... banjos, accordions, autoharps, a gruntaphone, a didgeridoo, as well as the
dreaded bowed psaltery (screeching arrowhead). Others bring their chairs to sit and watch, or
make s'mores, and find themselves singing the beer song, or "Seven Old Ladies Stuck in the
Lavatory" or dancing to a jig or waltz. Between sets cappuccinos and IBC's are passed to players
trapped by crowds, and those who are trapped look longingly at the golden throne. But there are
tunes to play.

The sets of tunes grow louder and longer, with smooth, or bizarre, or dramatic transitions. With a
herd of hammer dulcimers, guitars, and drums, and all the rest, the wall of sound grows larger.
The orchestra 'sections' doing solos start as "Fiddles!", and "Guitars!" but are followed by groups
that have "White Shoes!" or "Lacy Underwear!" or are "National Hammer Dulcimer Champions!"
or play "Nugget Mandolins!" or who are "Fiddlers Under the Age of 13!". You can almost
guarantee that a set will end abruptly if someone hollers "Clean Underwear!!".

At about 4:00 am, an exhausted group seems ready to play the last waltz, and camel croon for
biscuits and gravy, but a headless Banjo Buda appears, and Harmonium erupts. Again. The
crowd goes wild, again. "D" tunes are woven in and out, but the Harmonium will not die, not until
the hammers break and the fingers bleed... "Let them hear it in the Pecan Grove! Spank It!!!!"

Dave Firestine

The preceding was taken from the Carp Camp CD "Sad But True" which can be ordered
here!Over the years, many different camps have sprouted in Winfield, where friends and families
have come together to share a year of memories, build and decorate village's and play a lot of
music. The Carp Camp, or Gather in the Grass, has grown from a group of Kansans trying to find
a dry place to camp, to a multinational family of contest winning crazies marching in the wrist
band parade.

Carp Diem - A day in the life of the Carp

Welcome to the Carp Camp. At 7:00 in the morning, or noon, breakfast seems to have a
Colorado flavor, whether it is in a pan of bacon frying, cheese and chocolate omelets, or sliced
frozen blood sausage. Later in the day, the camp is relatively quiet, with some tunes on the
mandolin or dulcimer, practicing new tunes, or recalling one from previous years. "Do you
remember this one?" A turkey is being smoked, and maybe the kitchen too... an informal
workshop might break out, "Tinkle music 101", "Three note tunes" or "Ballads where at least one
person dies" or "Introduction to ThermoCarpoDynamic Theory: Spank it!"

Set back, break out an ice cold IBC, a hot plate of carp lips, and watch late arriving
Humungobagos circle the grove looking for an area to park in, eyeballing the spot you are trying
to save for the late arrivals... you might see a couple of postal workers setting up a barn sized
tarp guilt in the gusting winds, or hear the lilting sound of a distant honey wagon.

Small groups of musicians are playing tunes, or tuning, or laying out a straw path to the golden
throne of bladder relief, while others nap... then you can smell the smoked turkey, and the chili
corn bread from a dutch oven, and the music stops long enough for a wonderful meal... but the
long beard is still tuning his dulcimer.

When the twilight comes and the sun goes down, the dulcimers are close to standard pitch, or
most of the strings anyway, and the tunes begin... American, Irish, Scottish, Bulgarian... just a few
instruments at first, but the session grows quickly, drawn to the sound of the dulcimers and the
site of the flying carp. The sets of tunes are exploratory at first..."who knows this one?", "Lets try
it with this new one from the homework", and as more musicians arrive, standard carp tunes
creep in...

As more people arrive, they bring dulcimers, guitars, mandolins, whistles and fiddles, and outcast
instruments as well... banjos, accordions, autoharps, a gruntaphone, a didgeridoo, as well as the
dreaded bowed psaltery (screeching arrowhead). Others bring their chairs to sit and watch, or
make s'mores, and find themselves singing the beer song, or "Seven Old Ladies Stuck in the
Lavatory" or dancing to a jig or waltz. Between sets cappuccinos and IBC's are passed to players
trapped by crowds, and those who are trapped look longingly at the golden throne. But there are
tunes to play.

The sets of tunes grow louder and longer, with smooth, or bizarre, or dramatic transitions. With a
herd of hammer dulcimers, guitars, and drums, and all the rest, the wall of sound grows larger.
The orchestra 'sections' doing solos start as "Fiddles!", and "Guitars!" but are followed by groups
that have "White Shoes!" or "Lacy Underwear!" or are "National Hammer Dulcimer Champions!"
or play "Nugget Mandolins!" or who are "Fiddlers Under the Age of 13!". You can almost
guarantee that a set will end abruptly if someone hollers "Clean Underwear!!".

At about 4:00 am, an exhausted group seems ready to play the last waltz, and camel croon for
biscuits and gravy, but a headless Banjo Buda appears, and Harmonium erupts. Again. The
crowd goes wild, again. "D" tunes are woven in and out, but the Harmonium will not die, not until
the hammers break and the fingers bleed... "Let them hear it in the Pecan Grove! Spank It!!!!"

Dave Firestine

The preceding was taken from the Carp Camp CD "Sad But True" which can be ordered
here!
Carp Camp